Anime of Spring 2016: Mid-season Review, part 2

Here is the second part of my mid-season review.  Looking at what’s written below, the general mood seems to be one of criticism, except for Kiznaiver, anyway.  With that note, let’s get into my thoughts on MayoigaKiznaiverHaifuri, and Flying Witch.

Kyoumi aru

5) Mayoiga (aka The Lost Village)

At this point, I’m sticking around merely to see the end of the show.  I had hopes of these characters overcoming their fears and behaving rationally, but no dice.  At last, we have discovered that a village adjoins Nanaki village beyond the tunnel and that the monsters are both produced by our characters fears and truly are able to interact with the real world.  Our heroes must overcome their fears lest their phobias cause them more than mental harm, but can they?

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Observations on How Religion Rolls Back Superstition

Many watching Mayoiga have no doubt discerned that the characters are stupid.  Not that this sort of thing is rare in the horror genre, but here it should be pointed out that much of their stupidity derives from their superstitious ideas, which plainly comes forth in that most believe Masaki to be a ghost.  What is a ghost?  The soul or spirit of a deceased person.  It is in the nature of ghosts to be immaterial, and so they can’t be touched and don’t need food, which explains why Our Lord had St. Thomas the Apostle touch His wounds and why He ate fish before the apostles after His Resurrection.  I might add that one cannot tie up or wound ghosts either, as the protagonists of Mayoiga were able to do to Masaki.  The point of the above is that no Christian would take seriously the contention that Masaki was a ghost, but particular nonbelievers, lacking the education provided by the Faith, are more susceptible to superstition in this matter.

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The concept of religion guarding against superstition sounds odd to us: we’re trained to think of religion as promoting superstition.  Even in the days of Plutarch (c. 46 – c. 120 AD), the Romans were held to be superstitious by the Greeks because of their fervor for religion.  There are even some Catholic superstitions, which often base themselves on certain acts or rituals guaranteed to gain the object of our prayers.  In reality, there are several elements which much be present for a prayer to be effective, such as humility, devotion, confidence, necessity for salvation, and the will of God.  Believing a pious practice will obtain one’s prayers may increase one’s confidence and devotion, but without the other three conditions, one’s prayer will not be answered.  Sometimes a prayer to a lesser saint is more effective because one’s devotion to that saint is greater; but, as George MacDonald wrote, God would “instead of being a merciful Savior, be the ministering Genius of our destruction” if He answered every prayer exactly as we wished it.  Not everything we want advances our salvation or is in accord with God’s will.

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Random Thoughts on the Anime of Spring 2016

The past couple of years have introduced us to one solid season after another.  (It reminds me of the days where I despaired of the anime industry, which lead to posts like “Anime Spring Season 2012: Only Two Worthy Shows?“. Click on that if you want to read a really old post!) This season was no exception.  So, I limited myself to seven regular length shows lest I become overburdened.  (I’m not concerned about shorts taking up too much time.) See below for the shows which made the cut.  The shows are in no particular order.

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1) Space Patrol Luluco

The first two episodes greatly amused me, and I found myself surprised by the serious turn taken in the third episode.  Trigger is nothing if not creative, and I can’t wait to see how they meld the insane antics of this show with the more serious elements.  Fans of Kill la Kill will no doubt see similarities between Luluco and Mako Mankanshoku.  Having a Mako-ish character as the heroine ought to make for a very memorable short.

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