A Samurai Anime You Should Watch: Angolmois

Happy New Year to my dears readers!  You have not heard from me since Christmas, but I’m still around.  My schedule for the near future promises to be freer than it has been for the past several months, so I hope to produce more content.  This content will include my top five anime from 2018, a run down of what I watched for Fall 2018, and what I intend to watch this season.  (So far, Boogiepop and Others, The Promised Neverland, and The Rising of the Shield Hero have caught my attention.)  Two of those posts are late indeed, but better late than never!

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In the current post, I want to encourage everyone to watch Angolmois: Record of the Mongol Invasion.  Angolmois came out during the summer of 2018, but I did not discover it until December of last year.  I love samurai anime, especially those with a strong core of bushido.  Angolmois does not disappoint on this score as it drips with the virtues of the samurai.  Any fan of samurai anime or medieval action would do well to pick up this anime.

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The Latest Addition to My Top Fifty: Captain Harlock

Today, I have completed watching the forty-two episode long Space Pirate Captain Harlock.  I can recommend few series to my dear readers as heartily.  If you check my Top Fifty Anime Series list, you’ll see that I placed this classic in sixth place–below Wolf’s Rain and above Mardock Scramble.  (Soukou no Strain has sadly dropped off the list, leaving Gokudo precariously in last place.)  Nothing shakes up a top fifty list like watching acknowledged classics!  I heartily recommend Anime Classics Zettai! by Brian Camp and Julie Davis, which fairly represents the best anime OVAs, movies, and series until the year 2007.  Who knows?  You might find yourself a new favorite.

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Briefly, let me explain why Captain Harlock so deeply appeals to me.  My dear readers likely know that Japan’s martial arts tradition stands as my first introduction to Japanese culture.  I used to study Judo and Aikido and devoured books by and about Morihei Ueshiba, Gichin Funakoshi, Nitobe Inazo, and Miyamoto Musashi.  These books express the warrior-philosopher ethos known as Bushido.  In recent years, Japan has become much more cosmopolitan, and many anime refer to Bushido comically or treat it as old fashioned or obsolete.

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