Western Civilization Exists for the Mass

This article makes a very interesting point, and it also brings up a famous petition signed by none other than Agatha Christi to preserve the original Latin mass. Their efforts gave England and Wales special permission to use it in addition to the modern mass within their parishes.

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Many are stunned today at the speed in which western civilization is collapsing. Coinciding with this is the post-conciliar crisis within the Church, the fourth great crisis of Christendom as it has been described by that great defender of orthodoxy, Bishop Athanasius Schneider of Kazakhstan. What may not be as clear too many is the connection between the destruction of the Mass and of the collapse of the Christian west.

One man who understood this connection was Dr. John Senior, professor of English, Literature, and Classics and co-founder of the very successful Integrated Humanities Program at the University of Kansas. Dr. Senior taught for decades at the university level. He was also a convert to the Catholic faith, devoted to the traditional Mass and an attendee of Immaculata Chapel (SSPX) in St. Mary’s, Kansas.

Senior has been credited with inspiring a generation of young men and…

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Which ACCA-13 District Fits Your Personality and Career Goals?

Here’s an interesting post. If you remember the districts from this fascinating show, you can likely figure out which district I picked before reaching my comment. My runner up was Dowa.

Read the post and see where you’d like to reside if it were possible!

JAPANime Talks

We all have things that we want – things we desire.

And while those things require different degrees of effort, time and resources, there are factors that play crucial roles in the realization of one’s desires.

They are things that become your foundation before embarking on a much bigger and exciting journey ahead. For instance, the place where you grew up. 

Birthplace, of course, is not everything. But it does, at some point, give birth to your beliefs and influence your actions.

And when it comes to associating one’s birthplace with current societal status, nothing defines it better than the anime series, ACCA: 13-ku Kansatsu-ka (ACCA:  13 – Territory Inspection Dept.)

So let’s go visit Dowa Kingdom and see which district will make you feel at home while at the same time help realize your life goals!

PESHI – The Port District

This district is home to the kingdom’s best…

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Reblog: Girls’ Last Tour Episode 5

This post by Karandi has me reconsidering whether I was right to drop this show.

Review: Normally I would be the first to describe something like Girls’ Last Tour as dull. The plot does not exist other than two girls travelling around seemingly deserted world occasionally looking for food but mostly without any kind of direction. The two characters, while charming, aren’t anything particularly note worthy. Even the setting, post […]

via Girls’ Last Tour Episode 5: Beauty in Simplicity — 100WordAnime

Kino no Tabi -the Beautiful World- the Animated Series (Episode 4)

A Journey Through Life

Kino no Tabi -the Beautiful World- the Animated Series (Episode 4)

Since mass combat rolls didn’t need me, a ground pounder, while starfighters and starships in orbit are doing things, I decided to watch (with lowered volume) to watch Kino no Tabi’s fourth episode. This writeup was then delayed for a few days. Thank Goodness I don’t have a predetermined release schedule.

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Perfect Blue and Black Swan: An Homage to Insanity

Wow, it’s not often that one finds an anime post which quotes from scholarly journals! This is a very fascinating look at how Black Swan (2010) is a remake of Satoshi Kon’s Perfect Blue.

The Cinemoptimist

Alright kids. Let’s get a little pretentious.

I would love to publish some of this more formal work every once in awhile, when I get a chance, sometimes I find it fun to get a little deep and show off how much of a literal genius I am.

So. Without further ado, here we go.

Perfect Blue and Black Swan: An Homage to Insanity

In a dark city, a young artist driven to insanity as a result of the intense mental strain given to her by the performance art that she partakes in. The description above is a plot synopsis that might cause a film to jump to mind, Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan (2010).  But, this synopsis also describes the plot of the 1997 Japanese animated film Perfect Blue, directed by Satoshi Kon. Both films share many comparable features: main characters whose names are eerily similar (Nina and…

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10 Japanese Superstitions

November is National Blog Posting Month (NaBloPoMo), and I always try to post something every day during this time. Here’s a reblog from the Otaku Lounge on Japanese superstitions. This post will have some which you’ve never heard of.

OTAKU LOUNGE


One of the most interesting aspects to me about visiting another country is hearing about common superstitions. No matter how logical people may seem, no matter how grounded or rational the culture, there are always things that people will do or not do, say or not say, that are rooted firmly in myth and folklore. Some, like seeing a black cat cross your path, are common to many countries, while others are much more location-specific.

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Anime to Tryout for Fall 2017

Nine shows strike me as promising this season.  Two of these, Blood Blockade Battlefront & Beyond and Kino no Tabi, derive from original shows I rather enjoyed.  I’ve yet to write an article on the original Kino’s Journey, an immersive and introspective work.  On the other hand, Blood Blockade Battlefront inspired one article.  Naturally, the main motivation for me watching the sequels lies in how much I enjoyed the originals.  The seven other shows which caught my eye will be described below.

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1) Code Realize: Sousei no Himegimi (aka Code Realize: Guardian of Rebirth)

The plot concerns a young lady named Cardia who is afflicted with the curse of poisoning whatever she touches.  Naturally, she is shunned by society.  Yet, Arsène Lupin–the original, i.e. the grandfather of Lupin the Third–decides to lead her out of her seclusion into turn of the 20th century London on a journey of discovery.

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Berserk’s Occult Theme

Before I get into why I dropped Berserk, let me talk a little bit about a fantasy series I used to enjoy: The Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind.  I really enjoyed the struggles of Richard Rahl, the Mother Confessor Kahlan, and the Wizard Zedd.  Like Berserk, it had some unsavory moments–some very unsavory moments indeed.  Yet, I felt that the great storytelling outweighed the bad.

Steaming Guts

 

Then, I ran into Goodkind’s full-blown Objectivist philosophy in book eight, The Naked Empire.  Few moments in my reading life have depressed me as much as Richard Rahl inveighing against self-sacrifice as an evil.  Apparently, people should always act in their self-interest, and any sacrifice of one’s self-interest is immoral.  Never mind that the heroes frequently risk their lives and suffer quite a lot.  Also, many good people had sacrificed their lives for good causes by this point in the series, and the fantasy world’s universe includes God, who no doubt rewards the righteous.  The idea of self-sacrifice being a moral evil simply did not compute in my mind.  Despite having read 6,454 pages of Goodkind’s work–the equivalent of reading War and Peace about four and a half times, I put down the series and never picked it back up again.

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Wishing You a Happy Independence Day!

I just wanted to wish all of my dear readers a happy Independence Day!  Please, enjoy the video put out today by the channel Lord Drako Arakis.  He has some great anime sketches set to old military songs and sea shanties.  His sketches for “The Invalid Corps” are perfect!

Tomorrow, check out the blog Beneath the Tangles in order to check out which show surprised me the most this season and which was my favorite.

No One is Saved Alone: Farnese’s Journey to Virtue

Too few articles have come from me in the past month, my dear readers.  My hope is that July will prove more fruitful as I renew my acquaintance with my favorite religious writers and essayists–G. K. Chesterton in particular.

May you enjoy the post linked to below, which touches on some interesting issues present in Berserk (2017)!

No One is Saved Alone: Farnese’s Journey to Virtue

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BnT’s Winter 2017 Reviews

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Beneath the Tangles recently finished their reviews of anime from the Winter 2017 season.  Three of my own reviews on Onihei, Chain Chronicle, and Little Witch Academia can be found among them.  I’ve watched a few other shows this season and hope to write reviews of them and three older anime this weekend.  (I’ve been painfully busy this month until now.)  Please like and leave comments on the posts below!  Enjoy!

Winter Anime 2017 Review (Part 1/3) – Onihei

Winter Anime 2017 Review (Part 2/3) – Chain Chronicle

Winter Anime 2017 Review (Part 3/3) – Little Witch Academia

Examining Light Novels: On Rebellion

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In the latest post from my column on Beneath the Tangles, I examine the topic of revolt from the angle of Christian theology, bringing up the examples of “the Rising of the North” under Queen Elizabeth’s reign and the American Revolution.  What brought this topic to mind was the plot of the fourth volume of Slayers.  I hope to write many more volumes on this series in the future.  Click on the link below for the post!

Examining Light Novels: On Rebellion

 

Spectacle and Service — Little Witch Academia and the purpose of magic

atelier emily

diana cavendish floating teapot little witch academia episode 7, little witch academia episode 7 diana cavendish, diana cavendish little witch academia episode 7

How useful is floating a teapot in the air to serve hot tea?

Although both tea and wine have tannins — in varying amounts depending on steep time and prior to separating grape juice from the stems and skins in the case of wine — the former hardly needs to be aerated. Height is not necessary in the pour. And even if it was, a human could do the same with an equal amount of training.

What is the exact purpose of Diana Cavendish floating her teapot over to her teacher other than to pass her exam? Does she offer a service that couldn’t be provided by human hands?

No, she does not. The action is essentially useless.

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Fátima and the Desert Fathers

The three Fatima visionaries: Lucia, Francisco and Jacinta The three Fatima visionaries: Lucia, Francisco and Jacinta

by Marco Gregory da Vinha, Obl.O.S.B. (Marco and his wife, Isa, are Oblate novices of Silverstream Priory, Ireland)

I find myself writing today about a topic which I never thought I would – Fátima; specifically, the message of Fátima (or, at least, how I have come to understand it). Caveat: for those that came here expecting some comment on “the Consecration of Russia”, you can forget about that. That is a topic I’m not at all interested in touching. Let’s just say that I believe that that request was very time-specific, and is not necessarily what the “message” was all about, though it seems to me that to many it carries an almost messianic weight.

Love it or hate it, every Portuguese knows Fátima and has probably been there at least once in their life. In the minds of not a…

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Nine Years and Counting: The Null Set Keeps Blogging On

Steelbound has one of the longest running aniblogs on WordPress. He just posted on the occasion of his blog’s ninth anniversary. Be sure to check out his posts!

The Null Set

A little more than nine years ago – January 21st of 2008 – saw the first piece of writing published on The Null Set, and, thus, began a slipshod experiment that I’m shocked has continued for as long as it has.

I’ve yet to question my desire to continue blogging because, even in this recent time of diminished output, I still feel like that I get more back from my blog than I put into it. One of the reasons for this comes from the feedback I get from people who take the time to leave comments.

So, to my readers and commenters, Thank you! I want 2017 to be a better year for The Null Set than 2016 was.

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Medieval Book Review: The Wars of the Roses

Dan Jones covers a superlatively violent period of British history: 1420 – 1525.  This period sees the death of King Henry V, the loss of English land in France under Henry VI, a period of Civil War which only ended for good with the ascension of Henry VII, and the reign of Henry VIII before his troubles with the papacy.  Most writers describe the Wars of the Roses as a conflict between two rival houses (York and Lancaster), which only ended when Henry VII married Elizabeth of York in 1486–thus combining them.  Even so, many of the events following 1486 have to do with Henry VII and Henry VIII either dealing with attempts of pretenders to the throne to invade England or killing off everyone with Plantagenet blood in his veins.  And so, it is fair to say that 1525 marks the end of English internecine conflict and the threat posed by people who might claim succession to the throne.

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This history is every bit as violent as the preceding paragraph makes it sound.  Edward IV, Richard III, and Henry VII all won their crowns on the battlefield.  Henry V bequeathed his subjects a stable and prosperous kingdom, but died while his son and heir was a mere infant.  The clashes between aristocratic families over who held the reigns of power during Henry VI’s infancy led to England becoming every bit as turbulent as France during the Hundred Years’ War.  (Maybe more violent.  I don’t think that France can point to a Battle of Towton, which left 28,000 casualties…all killed.)  The usual story of two rival houses needing to unite in order to end this strife, popularized by authors like Shakespeare (Henry VIRichard III, with Romeo and Juliet offering a tragic version of the same), found acceptance among earlier English historians.    Dan Jones challenges this notion by pointing out all the political problems caused by Henry V’s death.  His history shows that England’s civil strife was hardly that simple.

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